The Source for Contemporary Art Quilts, Exhibitions & Appraisals


Hopi Koshare kachina doll
Hopi Koshare doll with watermelon

Koshare are among the five jester or trickster figures of the Pueblo Indians' Kachina religion. Hopi Koshare figures are both sacred and profane, and their behavior can be comic, lewd, scatological, eccentric, and alarming. Unmasked and adorned in black and white stripes, they amuse audiences during pauses in Kachina fertility dances with inappropriate actions, loud conversations, and gluttony, which often involves gorging themselves on watermelons. Their clowning is intended to defuse community tensions at the same time it re-enforces taboos and communicates tradition.

John Lefelhocz points out that "the world of fine art has and needs Koshare-like clowns as well." One of those fine art world clowns was Andy Warhol, whose paintings of Campbell soup cans first brought him to prominence in the early 1960s. Lefelhocz's quilt adds further layers to Warhol's dead pan Pop Art (Warhol said he painted Campbell's soup because his mother fed it to him and he ate it for lunch every day), bringing together Warhol and his painting of 100 cans and the Hopi Koshares and their use of watermelons to present ninety-eight cans of "Andy Koshare's Watermelon Soup." This is a prime example of Lefelhocz's concept of "juxtapassion," putting things he feels strongly about side by side. The title also of course puns on Koshare/kosher.

100 Cans by Andy Warhol
100 Cans
Andy Warhol, c. 1962

ornament

$3500

Contact Robert Shaw to purchase or for more information

More quilts by John Lefelhocz

98 Koshare Watermelon Soup Cans by John Lefelhocz

Detail of 98 Koshare Watermelon Soup Cans by John Lefelhocz


Toward Barred Island by Gayle Fraas and Duncan Slade (detail)

HomeAbout NewsArtistsOrderingRecently Sold Exhibitions BooksLecturesServicesContact

Toward Barred Island by Gayle Fraas and Duncan Slade (detail)


Bottom left and right: Toward Barred Island (detail) by Gayle Fraas and Duncan Slade